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Environmental stress and local adaptation in Daphnia magna

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56603

Boersma,  Maarten
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56642

De Meester,  Luc
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56945

Spaak,  Piet
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Boersma, M., De Meester, L., & Spaak, P. (1999). Environmental stress and local adaptation in Daphnia magna. Limnology and Oceanography, 44(2), 393-402.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E0B8-0
Zusammenfassung
The effects of fish kairomones, crowding chemicals, and day length on the life-history traits of a set of 16 Daphnia magna clones, derived from four populations that differ in fish-predation pressure, were studied. Significant among-population differences were observed, the differences being in concordance with the hypothesis of local adaptation. The among-population genetic differences were not mediated through a change in response to fish kairomones, but through an overall smaller body size, smaller eggs, and a higher number of eggs in clones derived from habitats in which fish are present. Using a model, we show that the observed changes in life-history characteristics may lead to differences in fitness under different predation regimes, such that populations from habitats with fish have highest fitness under fish-predation regimes and populations without a fish background have higher fitness values under invertebrate predation regimes