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Temperature adaptation in a geographically widespread zooplankter, Daphnia magna.

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56828

Mitchell,  S. E.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56790

Lampert,  W.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Mitchell, S. E., & Lampert, W. (2000). Temperature adaptation in a geographically widespread zooplankter, Daphnia magna. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 13(3), 371-382.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DF9F-F
Zusammenfassung
Evidence for temperature adaptation in Daphnia magna was inferred from variation in the shape of temperature reaction norms for somatic growth rate, a fitness-related trait. Ex-ephippial clones from eight populations across Europe were grown under standardized conditions after preacclimation at five temperatures (17-29 degrees C). Significant variation for grand mean growth rates occurred both within populations (among clones) and between populations. Genetic variation for reaction norm shape was found within populations, with temperature-dependent trade-offs in clone relative fitness. However, the population average responses to temperature were similar, following approximately parallel reaction norms. The among-population variation is not evidence for temperature adaptation. Lack of temperature adaptation at the population level may be a feature of intermittent populations where environmentally terminated diapause can entrain the planktonic stage of the life-history within a similar range of temperatures.