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C3 or C4 macrophytes: a specific carbon source for the development of semi-aquatic and terrestrial arthropods in Central Amazonian river-floodplains to δ13C values.

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56570

Adis,  Joachim
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Adis, J., & Victoria, R. L. (2001). C3 or C4 macrophytes: a specific carbon source for the development of semi-aquatic and terrestrial arthropods in Central Amazonian river-floodplains to δ13C values. Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies, 37(3), 193-198.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DF04-9
Zusammenfassung
C₄ plant species were proposed to generally represent inferior food sources compared to C₃ plants thus are avoided by herbivores, particularly insects, This was tested in semi-aquatic and terrestrial arthropods from Amazonian river-floodplains by carbon isotope discrimination (δ¹³C). Two semi-aquatic grasshopper species (Stenacris f. fissicauda, Tucayaca gracilis-Actididae) obtain their carbon during development from specific C₄ macrophytes and two semi-aquatic species (Cornops aquaticum-Acrididae, Paulinia acuminata-Pauliniidae) from Specific C₃ macrophytes. The terrestrial millipede Mestosoma hylaeicum (Paradoxosomatidae) obtains about 45% of its carbon from roots of one C₄ macrophyte during the development of immatures whereas adults use other food sources, including C₃ trees. Results suggest, that (1) both C₄ and C₃ plants represent distinct hosts for terrestrial arthropods in Amazonia; (2) immatures may use plant species with a different photosynthetic pathway than adults.