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Effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic cell surface properties of bacteria on feeding rates of heterotrophic nanoflagellates.

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56817

Matz,  Carsten
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56752

Jürgens,  Klaus
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Matz, C., & Jürgens, K. (2001). Effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic cell surface properties of bacteria on feeding rates of heterotrophic nanoflagellates. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 67(2), 814-820. doi:10.1128/AEM.67.2.814-820.2001.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DEAF-6
Zusammenfassung
The influence of cell surface hydrophobicity and electrostatic charge of bacteria on grazing rates of three common species of interception-feeding nanoflagellates was examined. The hydrophobicity of bacteria isolated from freshwater plankton was assessed by using two different methods (bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon and hydrophobic interaction chromatography). The electrostatic charge of the cell surface (measured as zeta potential) was;as analyzed by microelectrophoresis. Bacterial ingestion fates were determined by enumerating bacteria in food vacuoles by immunofluorescence labelling via strain-specific antibodies. Feeding rates varied about twofold for each flagellate species but showed no significant dependence on prey hydrophobicity or surface charge. Further evidence was provided by an experiment involving flagellate grazing on complex bacterial communities in a two-stage continuous culture system. The hydrophobicity values of bacteria that survived protozoan grazing were variable, but the bacteria did not tend to become more hydrophilic. We concluded that variability in bacterial cell hydrophobicity and variability in surface charge do not severely affect uptake rates of suspended bacteria or food selection by interception-feeding flagellates