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Journal Article

Exact compensation of stream drift as an evolutionarily stable strategy.

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56773

Kopp,  Michael
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56683

Gabriel,  Wilfried
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Kopp, M., Jeschke, J. M., & Gabriel, W. (2001). Exact compensation of stream drift as an evolutionarily stable strategy. Oikos, 92(3), 522-530.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DE9E-C
Abstract
The colonization cycle hypothesis predicts that adults of stream-dwelling insects preferentially disperse in the upstream direction in order to compensate for larval drift. Upstream biased dispersal has indeed been shown in many, albeit not all, natural populations. Based on a recently published analysis, we develop a simple stochastic model for the competition of genotypes with different dispersal strategies in a stream habitat. By means of an invasion analysis, we show that exact compensation of larval drift by upstream biased adult dispersal is an evolutionarily stable strategy. Exact compensation means that, on average, the net movement of individuals from birth to the time of reproduction is zero. At the population level, we show that, in general, upstream biased dispersal is not necessary for persistence, unless the reproductive rate is very low. Under all conditions, however, populations of exact compensators attain highest sizes or persistence times, respectively. Although selection pressure towards exact compensation is arguably very general in populations subject to stream drift, trade-offs or constraints might change the outcome of selection. Therefore. the analysis presented in this paper has to be viewed as a null model for optimal dispersal behavior in stream habitats.