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Impact of root morphology on metabolism and oxygen distribution in roots and rhizosphere from two Central Amazon floodplain tree species

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56649

De Simone,  Oliviero
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56702

Haase,  Karen
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56833

Müller,  Ewald
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56754

Junk,  Wolfgang J.
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

De Simone, O., Haase, K., Müller, E., Junk, W. J., Gonsior, G., & Schmidt, W. (2002). Impact of root morphology on metabolism and oxygen distribution in roots and rhizosphere from two Central Amazon floodplain tree species. Functional Plant Biology, 29(9), 1025-1035. doi:10.1071/PP01239.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DDB6-B
Zusammenfassung
Adaptation to prolonged flooding was investigated using cuttings of two tree species from the Central Amazon white-water floodplain (Várzea). Morphological features and oxygen distribution patterns were correlated with metabolic changes under hypoxia, such as alterations in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and adenylate energy charge (AEC) of root cells. Salix martiana (Leyb.) was able to react to hypoxic growth conditions with formation of adventitious roots rich in lysigenous aerenchyma, which facilitates root aeration by longitudinal oxygen transport and rhizosphere oxidation by radial oxygen loss (ROL). The oxygen concentration on the surface of adventitious roots of S. martiana reached 2-3 mg O2 L–1. The low resistance to gas exchange in Salix roots was reflected by low ADH activities, which ranged between 0.03-0.1 μmol NADH mg –1 min–1, and AEC values of 0.8-1 under hypoxic conditions. Adventitious roots were also formed by Tabernaemontana juruana ([Markgr.] Schumann ex. J.F. Macbride) during growth under low-oxygen conditions, although at a later stage. The gas-space continuum in roots of T. juruana was less pronounced, resulting in a 10-fold lower oxygen concentration in the root cortex under oxygen stress compared with adventitious roots of Salix. The lower oxygen content was reflected in 6-fold higher ADH activities and decreased AEC values. ROL occurred only at the non-suberized root tip, suggesting that the suberized hypodermis functions as a barrier against gas exchange between the root and the rhizosphere. These findings indicate that different strategies of adaptation to low oxygen levels are realized in the two species under investigation that occur naturally in the same ecosystem but inhabit different elevation sites