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Journal Article

Terrestrial invertebrates inhabiting lowland river floodplains of Central Amazonia and Central Europe: a review

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56570

Adis,  Joachim
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56754

Junk,  Wolfgang J.
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Adis, J., & Junk, W. J. (2002). Terrestrial invertebrates inhabiting lowland river floodplains of Central Amazonia and Central Europe: a review. Freshwater Biology, 47(4), 711-731.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DD56-3
Abstract
1. Amazonian terrestrial invertebrates produce high population densities during favourable periods and may suffer a drastic decrease during occasional floods and droughts. However, the monomodal, predictable flood pulse of the larger Amazonian rivers favours the development of morphological (respiratory organs, wing-dimorphism), phenological (synchronization of life cycles, univoltine mode of life), physiological (flooding ability, gonad dormancy, alternating number of developmental stages), and behavioural adaptations (migration, temporal diving) with numerous interactions. 2. In lowlands of Central Europe, the flood pulse of large rivers is less predictable than in Central Amazonia and is superimposed by the seasonal light/temperature pulse (summer/winter regime). Some terrestrial invertebrates show physiological resistance against inundation or drought, phenologies fitting the normal annual rhythm of water level fluctuation (quiescence or diapause of eggs or adult invertebrates), high dispersal ability and migration. However, most species survive simply using a ''risk strategy'', combining high reproduction rates, dispersal and reimmigration following catastrophic events. 3. The diversity of species in terrestrial invertebrates is lower in lowland riverine ecosystems of Central Amazonia and Central Europe compared with the respective uplands because of flood stress in these systems. However, floodplains in Central Amazonia possess a greater number of endemic species in comparison with Central European floodplains because of long periods of fairly stable climatic conditions in comparison with large palaeoclimatic changes in Central Europe.