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Pesticides in surface water, sediment, and rainfall of the northeastern Pantanal basin, Brazil

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56986

Wantzen,  Matthias
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56637

da Silva,  Carolina
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Laabs, V., Amelung, W., Pinto, A. A., Wantzen, M., da Silva, C., & Zech, W. (2002). Pesticides in surface water, sediment, and rainfall of the northeastern Pantanal basin, Brazil. Journal of Environmental Quality, 31(5), 1636-1648.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DCE2-F
Zusammenfassung
Within the last 25 years an intensive agriculture has developed in the highland regions of Mato Grosso state (Brazil), which involves frequent pesticide use in highly mechanized cash-crop cultures. To provide information on pesticide distribution and dynamics in the northeastern Pantanal basin (located in southern Mato Grosso), we monitored 29 pesticides and 3 metabolites in surface water, sediment, and rainwater of the study area during the main application season. In environmental samples, 19 pesticides and 3 metabolites were detected in measurable quantities, resulting in at least one pesticide detection in 68% of surface water samples (n = 139), 62% of sediment samples (n = 26), and 87% of rainwater samples (n = 91). Surface water samples were most frequently contaminated by endosulfan compounds (alpha-, beta-, -sulfate), ametryn, metolachlor, and metribuzin, although in low (<0.1 mug L-1) concentrations. Sediment samples exhibited concentrations up to 4.5 mug kg(-1) of p,p''-DDT, p,p''-DDE, endosulfan-sulfate, beta- endosulfan, and ametryn. In contrast, rainwater was polluted with substantial amounts of endosulfan, alachlor, metolachlor, trifluralin, monocrotofos, and profenofos (maximum concentrations = 0-3 to 2.3 mug L-1) in the highlands. Lowland rainwater samples taken 75 km from the next application area contained 5- to 10-fold lower mean pesticide concentration than in the highlands. Cumulative deposition rates of the pesticide sum within the study period ranged from 423 mug m(-2) in the highlands to 14 mug m(-2) in the lowlands. The atmospheric input of pesticides to ecosystems seemed to be of higher relevance in the tropical study area than known from temperate regions.