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Exceptional anoxia resistance in larval tiger beetle, Phaeoxantha klugii (Coleoptera : Cicindelidae)

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons57020

Zerm,  Matthias
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56570

Adis,  Joachim
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Zerm, M., & Adis, J. (2003). Exceptional anoxia resistance in larval tiger beetle, Phaeoxantha klugii (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae). Physiological Entomology, 28(2), 150-153.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DBD2-0
Zusammenfassung
The tiger beetle Phaeoxantha klugii inhabits Central Amazonian floodplains, where it survives the annual inundation period in the third-instar larval stage submerged in the soil at approximately 29 degreesC for up to 3.5 months. Because flooded soils quickly become anoxic, these larvae should be highly resistant to anoxia. The survival of adult and larval P. klugii was therefore tested during exposure to a pure nitrogen atmosphere in the laboratory at 29 degreesC. Adult beetles were not resistant (< 6 h). Survival of larvae decreased over time, maximum survival was 15 days, whereas time to 50% mortality was 5.7 days (95% confidence interval 3.8-7.9). Anoxia resistance was additionally tested in third-instar larvae submerged within sediment for 40 days before anoxia exposure in the laboratory. Anoxia resistance was greatly enhanced in these larvae, showing a survival rate of 50% after 26 days of anoxia exposure. It appears that the gradual flooding process and/or the submersion phase induced a physiological alteration, most probably a strong depression in metabolic rate, which requires some days for induction. The degree of anoxia resistance in larval P. klugii is remarkable among terrestrial arthropods worldwide, even more so considering the high ambient temperatures. The species is well-suited to serve as a model organism for studying the physiological mechanisms of anoxia and submersion resistance in terrestrial arthropods inhabiting tropical floodplains.