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Two parthenogenetic millipede species/lines of the genus Poratia Cook & Cook, 1894 (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Pyrgodesmidae) found free from Wolbachia bacteria

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons57008

Witzel,  K.-P.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56570

Adis,  J.
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Witzel, K.-P., Zakharov, I. A., Goryacheva, I. I., Adis, J., & Golovatch, S. I. (2003). Two parthenogenetic millipede species/lines of the genus Poratia Cook & Cook, 1894 (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Pyrgodesmidae) found free from Wolbachia bacteria. African Invertebrates, 44(1), 331-338.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DBC7-A
Zusammenfassung
No indication of the presence of Wolbachia as the bacterial agent that may be involved in the development of parthenogenesis in Diplopoda was obtained using both eggs and torsos of the millipedes Poratia obliterata (Kraus, 1960) (a parthenogenetic hothouse population in Europe, and bisexual free-living ones in Amazonia) and P. digitata (Porat, 1889) (obligate parthenogens in European hothouses) subjected to PCR of various specificity ranges. By cloning and sequencing, application of primers specific to all eubacteria revealed various species of ubiquitous bacteria with different metabolic features or part of a typical soil bacterial community. Among these, flavobacteria were the commonest, but their possible roles as sex-ratio distortion agents in Diplopoda are still to be documented