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Journal Article

Water relations of Amazonian várzea trees

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56855

Parolin,  Pia
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56833

Müller,  Ewald
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56754

Junk,  Wolfgang J.
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Parolin, P., Müller, E., & Junk, W. J. (2005). Water relations of Amazonian várzea trees. International Journal of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 31(4), 361-364.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DA3E-8
Abstract
Trees of the Amazon River floodplain (várzea) are subjected to regular periods of waterlogging which last up to seven months every year. The present study shows the importance of stem water storage for buffering root water uptake restrictions during water logging in different tree species which are common in this environment. With the method of Granier, total water fluxes were measured in five individuals of each of six species (Crateva benthami, Laetia corymbulosa, Nectandra amazonum, Pseudobombax munguba, Tabebuia barbata and Vitex cymosa) with different phenologies, located in a várzea inundation forest near Manaus, Brazil. Xylem sap flux density was positively correlated with the above stand or upper canopy diurnal variation of vapour pressure deficit in all tree species under study. Increasing above stand or upper canopy vapor pressure deficit lead to an increasing sap flux density and total sap flow, and vice versa. Reduced water availability during day time was buffered by stem water which was filled up during night time. The severe physiological stress caused by anoxic conditions in the root zone was indicated by a reduction of the transpiring surfaces via leaf shedding. Stem water store could buffer water shortage during day time