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Salinity tolerance in Daphnia magna: characteristics of genotypes hatching from mixed sediments

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56851

Ortells,  Raquel
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56884

Reusch,  Thorsten B. H.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;
Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56790

Lampert,  Winfried
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Ortells, R., Reusch, T. B. H., & Lampert, W. (2005). Salinity tolerance in Daphnia magna: characteristics of genotypes hatching from mixed sediments. Oecologia, 143, 509-516. doi:10.1007/s00442-005-0027-2.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DA0E-3
Zusammenfassung
The hatching of diapausing eggs is a means of temporal dispersal that can provide populations with genotypes adapted to different environments. In a salinity-variable shallow lake, we predicted that the mixing of different age-classes of eggs in the sediment may yield genotypes with different salinity optima. The alternative would be the absence of local adaptation and the presence of a homogenous population of salt-tolerant genotypes with high phenotypic plasticity. We tested these alternatives by isolating Daphnia magna resting eggs from different sediment depths, exposing them to hatching cues at different salinity levels and measuring the performance of hatched individuals. Results revealed a homogeneous sediment with generally broad-tolerance genotypes and some genotypes with low salt tolerance, which supports the second hypothesis. However, the disturbed character of the sediment hampered historical reconstruction. The absence of local adaptation in the diapausing egg bank may be the result of various scenarios in the response of D. magna populations to severe salinity changes in the lake.