de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Leaf litter addition experiments in riparian ponds with different connectivity to a Cerrado stream in Mato Grosso, Brazil

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56986

Wantzen,  Karl M.
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56636

Nunes da Cunha,  Cátia
Working Group Tropical Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)

Wantzen_2005.pdf
(Publisher version), 323KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Wantzen, K. M., Rosa, F. R. d., Neves, C. d. O., & Nunes da Cunha, C. (2005). Leaf litter addition experiments in riparian ponds with different connectivity to a Cerrado stream in Mato Grosso, Brazil. Amazoniana, 18(3/4), 387-396.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D96D-4
Abstract
Using standardized artificial substrates (bricks and nylon nets), we analyzed the effect of different treatments on benthic invertebrate colonization in riparian ponds of a Cerrado stream in Mato Grosso, Brazil. Treatments were (1) leaf litter (removal vs. addition of naturally fallen, undecomposed leaves), (2) connectivity (meander pond: direct connection; connected pond: indirect connection; and isolated pond; no connection to the stream) and (3) season (dry vs. rainy season). Benthic invertebrate colonization was generally low. Approximatly 78 % of all animals were chironomids, with microcrustaceans (cladocerans and harpacticoids) together making up nearly 7 %, springtails 3 %, caddisfly larvae 2.1 %, mayfly larvae 1 %. The isolated pond was the least densely colonized habitat, with highly significant lower densities than the two connected ponds (Factorial ANOVAs, p <0.0001). Season had a strong effect on colonization density, which was significantly higher during the rainy than during the dry period (p = 0.001). Significant positive effects of the litter addition treatment on invertebrate colonization were only found during the dry season in the meander pond, where invertebrate densities increased about threefold between litter-free and litter-added treatments (p = 0.03). All other combinations showed a slightly negative, non-significant effect of litter addition. As only few specimen of shredding invertebrates were found, we concluded that recently fallen leaf litter seems to be more important as a mechanical matrix for colonization, FPOM retention and cover from predators, than as a food source in riparian ponds of Cerrado streams.