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Journal Article

Site-specific methane production and subsequent midge mediation within Esthwaite Water, UK

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56641

Deines,  Peter
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56696

Grey,  Jonathan
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Deines, P., & Grey, J. (2006). Site-specific methane production and subsequent midge mediation within Esthwaite Water, UK. "Natural selection is ecology in action". Dedicated to Professor Dr. Winfried Lampert on the occasion of his 65th birthday, 317-334. doi:10.1127/0003-9136/2006/0167-0317.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D875-9
Abstract
Previous analyses of larval chironomid delta C-13 have suggested that methanotrophic contribution to biomass is site-specific within lakes. We determined larval biomass, larval and methane gas stable carbon isotopes, and potential methane production from the sediments underlying different water column depths in Esthwaite Water, UK. Methane production increased whereas larval delta C-13 values typically became lighter with increasing lake depth. Reduced methane production at 15 m depth and correspondingly less C-13-depleted larvae in the second year of study suggests that the rate of methane production influenced larval assimilation of methane-derived biomass. Larval distribution and other site-specific parameters, combined with two-source mixing models, were used to estimate potential methane-mediation via the abundant chironomid biomass to higher predators.