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Predator-induced escape response in Daphnia

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56862

Pijanowska,  Joanna
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56638

Dawidowicz,  Piotr
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56990

Weider,  Lawrence J.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Pijanowska, J., Dawidowicz, P., & Weider, L. J. (2006). Predator-induced escape response in Daphnia. "Natural selection is ecology in action". Dedicated to Professor Dr. Winfried Lampert on the occasion of his 65th birthday, 77-87. doi:10.1127/0003-9136/2006/0167-0077.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D866-B
Zusammenfassung
We studied the effects of predator exudates on evasion efficiency in two Daphnia magna clones that differed in their sensitivity to the kairomones. Pre-exposure to kairomones significantly increased the chances of survival of sensitive Daphnia when confronted with actively-foraging invertebrate and vertebrate predators, as compared to individuals which had not been pre-exposed to predator chemical cues. The induced response is adaptive: predators foraging on a mixture of sensitized and non-sensitized individuals, first removed those which had not been pre-exposed, or were non-sensitive to predator exudates. Predator-induced escape responses, therefore, can be a target for selection.