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Journal Article

Polymorphism and signature of selection in the MHC class I genes of the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56904

Schaschl,  H.
Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56989

Wegner,  K. M.
Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schaschl, H., & Wegner, K. M. (2006). Polymorphism and signature of selection in the MHC class I genes of the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus. Journal of Fish Biology, 89(Suppl. B), 177-188. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8649.2006.01223.x.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D825-E
Abstract
The role and intensity of positive selection maintaining the polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes in the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeams was investigated. The highly polymorphic set of MHC class I genes found was organized in a single linkage group. Between 5 and 14 sequence variants per individual were identified by single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Segregation analysis studied in 10 three-spined stickleback families followed the expected pattern of Mendelian inheritance. The gamete fusion in three-spined stickleback thus seems to be random with respect to the MHC class I genes. The DNA sequence analyses showed that the expressed MHC class I loci are under strong selection pressure, possibly mediated by parasites. Codons that were revealed to be under positive selection are potentially important in antigen binding. MHC class I sequences did not form significant supported clusters within a phylogenetic tree. Analogous to MHC class II genes, it was not possible to assign the class I sequences to a specific locus, suggesting that the class I genes may have been generated by recent gene duplication.