de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Datenschutzhinweis Impressum Kontakt
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

Distributional patterns and community structure of Caribbean coral reef fishes within a river-impacted bay

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56812

Mallela,  J.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56716

Harrod,  C.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;
Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Mallela, J., Roberts, C., Harrod, C., & Goldspink, C. R. (2007). Distributional patterns and community structure of Caribbean coral reef fishes within a river-impacted bay. Journal of Fish Biology, 70(2), 523-537. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8649.2007.01323.x.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D7DA-D
Zusammenfassung
This study examined how riverine inputs, in particular sediment, influenced the community structure and trophic composition of reef fishes within Rio Bueno, north Jamaica. Due to river discharge a distinct gradient of riverine inputs existed across the study sites. Results suggested that riverine inputs (or a factor associated with them) had a structuring effect on fish community structure. Whilst fish communities at all sites were dominated by small individuals (< 20 cm), diversity and total biomass were reduced with increased proximity to the river mouth. The abundance of all fishes, but particularly small-bodied, juvenile and herbivorous fishes was reduced in turbid water when compared to clear-water sites. Results strongly suggest that fluvial sediment inputs may play an important role in structuring fish assemblages even under intense fishing pressure.