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Continuous variation in the pattern of marine v. freshwater foraging in brown trout Salmo trutta L. from Loch Lomond, Scotland

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56716

Harrod,  C.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;
Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Etheridge, E. C., Harrod, C., Bean, C., & Adams, C. E. (2008). Continuous variation in the pattern of marine v. freshwater foraging in brown trout Salmo trutta L. from Loch Lomond, Scotland. Journal of Fish Biology, 73(1), 44-53. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01905.x.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D700-6
Zusammenfassung
Carbon stable-isotope analysis showed that individual brown trout Salmo trutta in Loch Lomond adopted strategies intermediate to that of freshwater residency or anadromy, suggesting either repeated movement between freshwater and marine environments, or estuarine residency. Carbon stable-isotope (δ13C) values from Loch Lomond brown trout muscle tissue ranged from those indicative of assimilation of purely freshwater-derived carbon to those reflecting significant utilization of marine-derived carbon. A single isotope, two-source mixing model indicated that, on average, marine C made a 33% contribution to the muscle tissue C of Loch Lomond brown trout. Nitrogen stable isotope, δ15N, but not δ13C was correlated with fork length suggesting that larger fish were feeding at a higher trophic level but that marine feeding was not indicated by larger body size. These results are discussed with reference to migration patterns in other species.