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Factors affecting preference responses of the freshwater ciliate Uronema nigricans to bacterial prey

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56752

Jürgens,  Klaus
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Aya, B., Latatu, A., Artolozaga, I., Jürgens, K., & Iriberri, J. (2009). Factors affecting preference responses of the freshwater ciliate Uronema nigricans to bacterial prey. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology, 56(2), 188-193. doi:10.1111/j.1550-7408.2008.00387.x.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D5D0-4
Zusammenfassung
To enhance our understanding of the factors affecting feeding selectivity of bacterivorous protists in aquatic systems, we examined the preference responses of the freshwater ciliate Uronema nigricans towards three bacterial prey taxa, Pseudomonas luteola, Serratia rubidaea, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Potential factors influencing the predator-prey contact rate included the previous feeding history of the ciliate and physiological state of bacteria. Preference indexes were obtained from multiple-choice mazes in which ciliates moved preferentially towards alternative bacteria or the prey species on which they had been feeding. Uronema nigricans showed differential attraction towards the offered prey types, and these preferences varied as a function of the ciliate feeding history: U. nigricans growing on P. luteola showed lower preference responses towards the offered bacteria than U. nigricans growing on S. rubidaea. The bacteria in stationary phase elicited a higher degree of attraction than bacteria in exponential phase, probably due to a higher concentration of carbohydrates in the former. Therefore, this protist will preferentially swim towards bacteria in stationary growth phase, although the degree of this response will be affected by the recent feeding history of the ciliate.