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Journal Article

PSR J1838-0537: Discovery of a young, energetic gamma-ray pulsar

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons40533

Pletsch,  H. J.
Observational Relativity and Cosmology, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons40518

Allen,  B.
Observational Relativity and Cosmology, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons40519

Aulbert,  C.
Observational Relativity and Cosmology, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons40523

Fehrmann,  H.
Observational Relativity and Cosmology, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

1207.5333
(Preprint), 2MB

APJL_755_1_L20.pdf
(Any fulltext), 1001KB

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Citation

Pletsch, H. J., Guillemot, L., Allen, B., Kramer, M., Aulbert, C., Fehrmann, H., et al. (2012). PSR J1838-0537: Discovery of a young, energetic gamma-ray pulsar. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 755(1): L20. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/755/1/L20.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D259-4
Abstract
We report the discovery of PSR J1838-0537, a gamma-ray pulsar found through a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsar has a spin frequency of 6.9 Hz and a frequency derivative of -2.2e-11 Hz/s, implying a young characteristic age of 4970 years and a large spin-down power of 5.9e36 erg/s. Follow-up observations with radio telescopes detected no pulsations, thus PSR J1838-0537 appears radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. In September 2009 the pulsar suffered the largest glitch so far seen in any gamma-ray-only pulsar, causing a relative increase in spin frequency of about 5.5e-6. After the glitch, during a putative recovery period, the timing analysis is complicated by the sparsity of the LAT photon data, the weakness of the pulsations, and the reduction in average exposure from a coincidental, contemporaneous change in the LAT's sky-survey observing pattern. The pulsar's sky position is coincident with the spatially extended TeV source HESS J1841-055 detected by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). The inferred energetics suggest that HESS J1841-055 contains a pulsar wind nebula powered by the pulsar.