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Journal Article

Inhibitory effects of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter upon metabolic processes in biofilms from contrasting rivers and streams

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56815

Marxsen,  Jürgen
Limnological River Station Schlitz, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Freeman, C., Lock, M. A., Marxsen, J., & Jones, S. E. (1990). Inhibitory effects of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter upon metabolic processes in biofilms from contrasting rivers and streams. Freshwater Biology, 24, 159-166.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-CA21-5
Abstract
SUMMARY 1. The effect of removal of organic matter >1000 apparent molecular weight (AMW) on biofilm processes was determined in three contrasting streams in West Germany and three contrasting rivers in the U.K. This process removed 66-85% of the dissolved organic matter supply. 2. Elevations in extracellular enzyme activity (β-glucosidase, phosphatase and esterase), metabolic heat-output, bacterial density and poly-β-hydroxy alkanoate (PHA) content (a prokaryote storage product) were noted throughout the study in response to the removal of organic matter. This suggests that there are inhibitory substances present in the dissolved organic matter pool >1000 AMW. It is probable that phenolics play a role in this inhibition. 3. Decreases in metabolic heat output, β-glucosidase activity and PHA content were noted at four sites in response to the removal of >1000 AMW material. 4. The divergent responses of the six river/stream biofilms are indicative of radically differing metabolic/catabolic processes, on a spatial and/or temporal basis, to a major organic supply perturbation.