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Capacity of discontinuous egg development and its importance for the geographic distribution of the warm water stenotherm, Dinocras cephalotes (Insecta: Plecoptera: Perlidae)

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons57026

Zwick,  Peter
Limnological River Station Schlitz, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Zwick, P. (1996). Capacity of discontinuous egg development and its importance for the geographic distribution of the warm water stenotherm, Dinocras cephalotes (Insecta: Plecoptera: Perlidae). Annales de Limnologie, 32(3), 147-160.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-C93A-8
Zusammenfassung
Aspects of the egg biology of the perlid stonefly, Dinocras cephalotes (Curtis), were studied experimentally. Development under constant laboratory conditions did not differ from development under variable field conditions. Exposure to 4°C, the lower threshold temperature for egg development, caused abrupt interruptions of embryonic development. Development was resumed after return to favourable temperatures, with an approximate two-week-delay. Up to six interruptions of egg development did not negatively affect hatching success, regardless of developmental stage at which disturbances occurred. However, the older embryos grew, the more rapidly development was resumed after a cold disturbance; embryos from fully developed eggs hatched even at 4°C, although this is too cold to support larval growth. While eggs at 4°C remain dormant and vital for long periods of time, eggs exposed to suboptimal temperatures (10°C) remain only temporarily dormant and eventually develop and hatch. D. cephalotes is assumed to satisfy its high thermal demand for egg development under harsh conditions, for example in arctic Scandinavia, by opportunistically using summer warmth and spreading embryogenesis over more than one year. I suggest that high cue temperatures required to initiate egg development in Scandinavian populations are adaptive and ensure that larvae in the Arctic hatch under favourable seasonal conditions.