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Extrinsic normalization for vocal tracts depends on the signal, not on attention

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons1646

Sjerps,  Matthias J.
Language Comprehension Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Psychology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons122

McQueen,  James M.
Language Comprehension Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons127

Mitterer,  Holger
Language Comprehension Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Volltexte (frei zugänglich)

SMM_2012_Interspeech.pdf
(beliebiger Volltext), 356KB

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Zitation

Sjerps, M. J., McQueen, J. M., & Mitterer, H. (2012). Extrinsic normalization for vocal tracts depends on the signal, not on attention. In Proceedings of INTERSPEECH 2012: 13th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association (pp. 394-397).


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-C3CC-A
Zusammenfassung
When perceiving vowels, listeners adjust to speaker-specific vocal-tract characteristics (such as F1) through "extrinsic vowel normalization". This effect is observed as a shift in the location of categorization boundaries of vowel continua. Similar effects have been found with non-speech. Non-speech materials, however, have consistently led to smaller effect-sizes, perhaps because of a lack of attention to non-speech. The present study investigated this possibility. Non-speech materials that had previously been shown to elicit reduced normalization effects were tested again, with the addition of an attention manipulation. The results show that increased attention does not lead to increased normalization effects, suggesting that vowel normalization is mainly determined by bottom-up signal characteristics.