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How linguistic and probabilistic properties of a word affect the realization of its final /t/: Studies at the phonemic and sub-phonemic level

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons1469

Ernestus,  Mirjam
Language Comprehension Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Center for Language Studies, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands;

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Schuppler_J_Phonetics_2012.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 465KB

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Zitation

Schuppler, B., van Dommelen, W. A., Koreman, J., & Ernestus, M. (2012). How linguistic and probabilistic properties of a word affect the realization of its final /t/: Studies at the phonemic and sub-phonemic level. Journal of Phonetics, 40, 595-607. doi:10.1016/j.wocn.2012.05.004.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-A28E-7
Zusammenfassung
This paper investigates the realization of word-final /t/ in conversational standard Dutch. First, based on a large number of word tokens (6747) annotated with broad phonetic transcription by an automatic transcription tool, we show that morphological properties of the words and their position in the utterance's syntactic structure play a role for the presence versus absence of their final /t/. We also replicate earlier findings on the role of predictability (word frequency and bigram frequency with the following word) and provide a detailed analysis of the role of segmental context. Second, we analyze the detailed acoustic properties of word-final /t/ on the basis of a smaller number of tokens (486) which were annotated manually. Our data show that word and bigram frequency as well as segmental context also predict the presence of sub-phonemic properties. The investigations presented in this paper extend research on the realization of /t/ in spontaneous speech and have potential consequences for psycholinguistic models of speech production and perception as well as for automatic speech recognition systems.