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Thinking-for-speaking in early and late bilinguals

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons4274

Lai,  Vicky T.
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, Nijmegen, NL;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons71738

Garrido Rodriguez,  Gabriela
International Max Planck Research School for Language Sciences, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, Nijmegen, NL;
Language and Cognition Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Lai_Garrido_Narasimhan_2013.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 625KB

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Zitation

Lai, V. T., Garrido Rodriguez, G., & Narasimhan, B. (2014). Thinking-for-speaking in early and late bilinguals. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 17, 139-152. doi:10.1017/S1366728913000151.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-A0BD-2
Zusammenfassung
When speakers describe motion events using different languages, they subsequently classify those events in language-specific ways (Gennari, Sloman, Malt & Fitch, 2002). Here we ask if bilingual speakers flexibly shift their event classification preferences based on the language in which they verbally encode those events. English–Spanish bilinguals and monolingual controls described motion events in either Spanish or English. Subsequently they judged the similarity of the motion events in a triad task. Bilinguals tested in Spanish and Spanish monolinguals were more likely to make similarity judgments based on the path of motion versus bilinguals tested in English and English monolinguals. The effect is modulated in bilinguals by the age of acquisition of the second language. Late bilinguals based their judgments on path more often when Spanish was used to describe the motion events versus English. Early bilinguals had a path preference independent of the language in use. These findings support “thinking-for-speaking” (Slobin, 1996) in late bilinguals.