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Do you see what I'm singing? Visuospatial movement biases pitch perception

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons4512

Holler,  Judith
University of Manchester;
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Language in our Hands: Sign and Gesture, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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paper0056.pdf
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Zitation

Connell, L., Cai, Z. G., & Holler, J. (2012). Do you see what I'm singing? Visuospatial movement biases pitch perception. In N. Miyake, D. Peebles, & R. P. Cooper (Eds.), Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2012) (pp. 252-257). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-A039-8
Zusammenfassung
The nature of the connection between musical and spatial processing is controversial. While pitch may be described in spatial terms such as “high” or “low”, it is unclear whether pitch and space are associated but separate dimensions or whether they share representational and processing resources. In the present study, we asked participants to judge whether a target vocal note was the same as (or different from) a preceding cue note. Importantly, target trials were presented as video clips where a singer sometimes gestured upward or downward while singing that target note, thus providing an alternative, concurrent source of spatial information. Our results show that pitch discrimination was significantly biased by the spatial movement in gesture. These effects were eliminated by spatial memory load but preserved under verbal memory load conditions. Together, our findings suggest that pitch and space have a shared representation such that the mental representation of pitch is audiospatial in nature.