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Contribution to Collected Edition

Dualization and Institutional Complementarities: Industrial Relations, Labor Market, and Welfare State Changes in France and Germany

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons41309

Thelen,  Kathleen Ann
Auswärtiges Wissenschaftliches Mitglied, MPI for the Study of Societies, Max Planck Society;
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA;

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Citation

Palier, B., & Thelen, K. A. (2012). Dualization and Institutional Complementarities: Industrial Relations, Labor Market, and Welfare State Changes in France and Germany. In P. Emmenegger, S. Häusermann, B. Palier, & M. Seeleib-Kaiser (Eds.), The Age of Dualization: The Changing Face of Inequality in Deindustrializing Societies (pp. 201-225). Oxford: Oxford University Press.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-9CA7-2
Abstract
The French and German political economies have been significantly reconfigured over the past two decades. Although the changes have often been more piecemeal than revolutionary, their cumulative effects are profound. The chapter characterizes the changes that have taken place as involving a process of dualization, and argues that what gives contemporary developments a different character from the past is that they are now explicitly underwritten by state policy. It emphasizes complementarities across institutional realms, and show how these linkages have facilitated the spread of dualization – beginning in the field of industrial relations, moving into labor market dynamics, and finally finding institutional expression in welfare state reforms. The result in France and Germany has been the institutionalization, with state support, of an apparently stable but distinctly less egalitarian model.