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Hochschulschrift

Optical Control of X-Ray Lasing

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons37697

Darvasi,  Gabor
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society,;

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diplom-Darvasi.pdf
(beliebiger Volltext), 6MB

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Zitation

Darvasi, G. (2011). Optical Control of X-Ray Lasing. Diploma Thesis, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, Heidelberg, Germany.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-85BF-1
Zusammenfassung
X-ray free-electron lasers have revolutionized x-ray science by achieving unprecedented intensities exceeding 1018 W/cm2. However, they lack temporal coherence and controllability of their pulses' temporal and spatial properties, which is essential for many applications. We investigate the possibility to control and shape x-ray laser pulses with optical light. An optical laser pulse is used to control the population inversion on the 2p -> 1s transition in a neon x-ray laser pumped by an x-ray free-electron laser. Theoretical results are presented based on population and photon rate equations. We study the dependance of the x-ray laser's output on the pump pulse's and the optical laser pulse's properties. Small-signal gain calculations reveal that for a high degree of control narrowband pumping radiation is required and the optical laser pulse must have precise timing with respect to the pump pulse. Self-consistent gain calculations show that it will be possible to do spatial pulse shaping and to produce high-intensity, sub-femtosecond pulses that are controlled by and synchronized to the optical laser pulse with femtosecond precision. Our results indicate that the presented scheme would make it possible to establish pump-probe techniques with femtosecond x-ray and optical pulse