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Interaction of elastic bodies via surface forces 2. Exponential decay

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons48921

Vinogradova,  Olga I.
MPI for Polymer Research, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons47866

Feuillebois,  F.
MPI for Polymer Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Vinogradova, O. I., & Feuillebois, F. (2003). Interaction of elastic bodies via surface forces 2. Exponential decay. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 268(2), 464-475.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-63CF-F
Abstract
Our goal is to study theoretically the effect of deformation on the exponentially decaying interaction of two elastic solids separated by a thin liquid film. The deformed shape of the surfaces and the contribution of the elasticity to the total force, i.e., an additional term present between elastic bodies, are calculated from continuum elastic theory via a new asymptotic technique. Both the deformation and the contribution of the elasticity to the force are found to be significant on the length scale over which the surface force acts. The surface deformation is exponentially decaying with a decay length equal to that of the original surface interaction. It is especially important for large and/or rapidly changing force. The contribution of the elasticity is also exponentially decaying, but with half the decay length. Its strength depends on the elastic constants and size of the solids and on the magnitude and gradient of the original surface force. Depending on how the separation is detected, it can appear either as an attractive or as a repulsive contribution to the force. Our results open the possibility of recalculating the measured force to the interaction free energy.