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Mechanisms involved in the amplification of the 11-year solar cycle signal in the tropical Pacific Ocean

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons37368

Misios,  S.
IMPRS on Earth System Modelling, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;
Middle and Upper Atmosphere, The Atmosphere in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons37320

Schmidt,  H.
Middle and Upper Atmosphere, The Atmosphere in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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JCLI-D-11-00261.pdf
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Citation

Misios, S., & Schmidt, H. (2012). Mechanisms involved in the amplification of the 11-year solar cycle signal in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Journal of Climate, 25, 5102- 5118. doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00261.1.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-51C1-9
Abstract
It is debated whether the response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to the 11-yr solar cycle forcing resembles a La Niña– or El Niño–like signal. To address this issue, ensemble simulations employing an atmospheric general circulation model with and without ocean coupling are conducted. The coupled simulations show no evidence for a La Niña–like cooling in solar maxima. Instead, the tropical sea surface temperature rises almost in phase with the 11-yr solar cycle. A basinwide warming of about 0.1 K is simulated in the tropical Pacific, whereas the warming in the tropical Indian and Atlantic Oceans is weaker. In the western Pacific, the region of deep convection shifts to the east, thus reducing the surface easterlies. This shift is independent of the ocean coupling because deep convection moves to the east in the uncoupled simulations too. The reduced surface easterlies cool the subsurface but warm the surface due to the reduction of heat transport divergence. The latter mechanism operates together with water vapor feedback, resulting in a stronger tropical Pacific warming relative to the warming over the tropical Indian and Atlantic Oceans. These results suggest that the atmospheric response to the 11-yr solar cycle drives the tropical Pacific response, which is amplified by atmosphere–ocean feedbacks operating on decadal time scales. Based on the coupled simulations, it is concluded that the tropical Pacific Ocean should warm when the sun is more active.