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Discovery of VHE gamma-ray emission from the SNR G15.4+0.1 with H.E.S.S

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons30608

Hofverberg,  Petter
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons30372

Chaves,  R. C. G.
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Volltexte (frei zugänglich)

1112.2901.zip
(Preprint), 586KB

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Zitation

Hofverberg, P., Chaves, R. C. G., Méhault, J., de Naurois, M., & H.E.S.S. Collaboration (2011). Discovery of VHE gamma-ray emission from the SNR G15.4+0.1 with H.E.S.S. In Proceedings of the 32nd International Cosmic Ray Conference (pp. 1-4).


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-4653-B
Zusammenfassung
Supernova remnants (SNRs) have emerged as one of the largest source classes in very-high-energy (VHE; E>0.1,TeV) astronomy. Many of the now known VHE gamma-ray emitting SNRs have been discovered by the H.E.S.S. imaging Cherenkov telescope array, thanks to its unique access to the inner galaxy. Statistically-significant emission of VHE gamma rays has now been detected from the direction of the supernova remnant G15.4+0.1. While the centroids of the H.E.S.S. source and the shell-type SNR are compatible, the VHE morphology suggests a center-dominated source at TeV energies, something which is at odds with the shell-like morphology observed at radio frequencies. This suggests that H.E.S.S. may be observing TeV emission from a previously unknown pulsar wind nebula (PWN) located within the boundaries of the radio shell. If this interpretation is correct, G15.4+0.1 would in fact be a composite SNR, the first case in which an SNR is identified as a composite on the basis of VHE gamma-ray observations. Archival data from MAGPIS gives exciting hints that there is radio emission from the central parts of the remnant, giving support to this hypothesis. Unfortunately, image artefacts from a nearby strong radio source produce considerable uncertainties in the radio analysis. Additional observations in both the radio and X-ray are needed to confirm the composite nature of G15.4+0.1 suggested by H.E.S.S.