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Controlling on-surface polymerization by hierarchical and substrate-directed growth

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons21783

Lafferentz,  Leif
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;
IOM-CNR Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park, 34149 Basovizza-Trieste, Italy;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons21573

Grill,  Leonhard
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lafferentz, L., Eberhardt, V., Dri, C., Africh, C., Comelli, G., Esch, F., et al. (2012). Controlling on-surface polymerization by hierarchical and substrate-directed growth. Nature Chemistry, 4, 215-220. doi:10.1038/nchem.1242.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-44EA-7
Abstract
A key challenge in the field of nanotechnology, in particular in the design of molecular machines, novel materials or molecular electronics, is the bottom-up construction of covalently bound molecular architectures in a well-defined arrangement. To date, only rather simple structures have been obtained because of the limitation of one-step connection processes. Indeed, for the formation of sophisticated structures, step-by-step connection of molecules is required. Here, we present a strategy for the covalent connection of molecules in a hierarchical manner by the selective and sequential activation of specific sites, thereby generating species with a programmed reactivity. This approach leads to improved network quality and enables the fabrication of heterogeneous architectures with high selectivity. Furthermore, substrate-directed growth and a preferred orientation of the molecular nanostructures are achieved on an anisotropic surface. The demonstrated control over reactivity and diffusion during covalent bond formation constitutes a promising route towards the creation of sophisticated multi-component molecular nanostructures.