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Conference Paper

A Simple Approach to Interactive Free-Form Shape Deformations

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45777

Yoshizawa,  Shin
Computer Graphics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons44112

Belyaev,  Alexander
Computer Graphics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45449

Seidel,  Hans-Peter
Computer Graphics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Yoshizawa, S., Belyaev, A., & Seidel, H.-P. (2002). A Simple Approach to Interactive Free-Form Shape Deformations. In Proceedings of the 10th Pacific Conference on Computer Graphics and Applications (Pacific Graphics 2002) (pp. 471-474). Los Alamitos, USA: IEEE.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-2F0B-2
Abstract
In this paper, we propose a set of free-form shape deformation techniques. The basic technique can be described as follows. Given a surface represented by a mesh and a control point, for every mesh vertex let us consider the difference between the control point and the vertex. The vertex is shifted by a displacement equal to the difference times a scale factor where the scale factor is given by a function depending nonlinearly on the difference. The function is bump-shaped and depends on a number of parameters. Varying the parameters leads to a rich palette of shape deformations. The proposed techniques include also shape deformations with multiple (real, auxiliary, and virtual) control points and constrained, directional, and anisotropic deformations. We demonstrate how that the proposed set of techniques allows a user to edit a given shape interactively and intuitively. The techniques use no mesh connectivity information and, therefore, can be applied directly to a shape given as a cloud of points.