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The MINERVA Project: Database Selection in the Context of P2P Search

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons44113

Bender,  Matthias
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45041

Michel,  Sebastian
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45720

Weikum,  Gerhard
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45808

Zimmer,  Christian
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bender, M., Michel, S., Weikum, G., & Zimmer, C. (2005). The MINERVA Project: Database Selection in the Context of P2P Search. In Datenbanksysteme in Business, Technologie und Web (BTW) (pp. 125-144). Bonn: Gesellschaft für Informatik.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-27FC-F
Abstract
This paper presents the MINERVA project that protoypes a distributed search engine based on P2P techniques. MINERVA is layered on top of a Chord-style overlay network and uses a powerful crawling, indexing, and search engine on every autonomous peer. We formalize our system model and identify the problem of efficiently selecting promising peers for a query as a pivotal issue. We revisit existing approaches to the database selection problem and adapt them to our system environment. Measurements are performed to compare different selection strategies using real-world data. The experiments show significant performance differences between the strategies and prove the importance of a judicious peer selection strategy. The experiments also present first evidence that a small number of carefully selected peers already provide the vast majority of all relevant results.