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Journal Article

A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing yeast protein arrays

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons44040

Assenov,  Yassen
Computational Biology and Applied Algorithmics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;
International Max Planck Research School, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons43993

Albrecht,  Mario
Computational Biology and Applied Algorithmics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Salamat-Miller, N., Fang, J., Seidel, C. W., Smalter, A. M., Assenov, Y., Albrecht, M., et al. (2006). A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing yeast protein arrays. Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, 5, 2263-2278.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-2200-9
Abstract
The high affinity of certain cellular polyanions for many proteins (polyanion-binding proteins (PABPs)) has been demonstrated previously. It has been hypothesized that such polyanions may be involved in protein structure stabilization, stimulation of folding through chaperone-like activity, and intra- and extracellular protein transport as well as intracellular organization. The purpose of the proteomics studies reported here was to seek evidence for the idea that the nonspecific but high affinity interactions of PABPs with polyanions have a functional role in intracellular processes. Utilizing yeast protein arrays and five biotinylated cellular polyanion probes (actin, tubulin, heparin, heparan sulfate, and DNA), we identified proteins that interact with these probes and analyzed their structural and amino acid sequence requirements as well as their predicted functions in the yeast proteome. We also provide evidence for the existence of a network-like system for PABPs and their potential roles as critical hubs in intracellular behavior. This investigation takes a first step toward achieving a better understanding of the nature of polyanion-protein interactions within cells and introduces an alternative way of thinking about intracellular organization.