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Journal Article

Temporal Glare: Real-Time Dynamic Simulation of the Scattering in the Human Eye

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45298

Ritschel,  Tobias
Computer Graphics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons44671

Ihrke,  Matthias
Computer Graphics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45095

Myszkowski,  Karol
Computer Graphics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45449

Seidel,  Hans-Peter
Computer Graphics, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ritschel, T., Ihrke, M., Frisvad, J. R., Coppens, J., Myszkowski, K., & Seidel, H.-P. (2009). Temporal Glare: Real-Time Dynamic Simulation of the Scattering in the Human Eye. Computer Graphics Forum (Proc. Eurographics 2009), 28(3), 183-192.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-19E7-E
Abstract
Glare is a consequence of light scattered within the human eye when looking at bright light sources. This effect can be exploited for tone mapping since adding glare to the depiction of high-dynamic range (HDR) imagery on a low-dynamic range (LDR) medium can dramatically increase perceived contrast. Even though most, if not all, subjects report perceiving glare as a bright pattern that fluctuates in time, up to now it has only been modeled as a static phenomenon. We argue that the temporal properties of glare are a strong means to increase perceived brightness and to produce realistic and attractive renderings of bright light sources. Based on the anatomy of the human eye, we propose a model that enables real-time simulation of dynamic glare on a GPU. This allows an improved depiction of HDR images on LDR media for interactive applications like games, feature films, or even by adding movement to initially static HDR images. By conducting psychophysical studies, we validate that our method improves perceived brightness and that dynamic glare-renderings are often perceived as more attractive depending on the chosen scene.