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  New insights into the parametrization of temperature and light responses of mono - and sesquiterpene emissions from Aleppo pine and rosemary

Staudt, M., Bourgeois, I., Al Halabi, R., Song, W., & Williams, J. (2017). New insights into the parametrization of temperature and light responses of mono - and sesquiterpene emissions from Aleppo pine and rosemary. Atmospheric Environment, 152, 212-221. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.12.033.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-9698-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-9699-A
Genre: Journal Article

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Staudt, M.1, Author
Bourgeois, I.1, Author
Al Halabi, R.1, Author
Song, W.2, Author              
Williams, J.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1external, escidoc:persistent22              
2Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, escidoc:1826285              

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 Abstract: Phytogenic emission of large volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as monoterpenes (MTs) and sesquiterpenes (SQTs) are key precursors to the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. However, controlled environment studies to elucidate emission responses to temperature and light are still sparse. In this study, the volatile contents and emission responses of Aleppo pine and Rosemary have been investigated. These two common Mediterranean species store semivolatiles inside (resin ducts) and outside (trichomes) their foliage tissues respectively. Both species emitted mainly MTs with basal emission rates of around 5 (Rosemary) and 10 (pine) μg g−1 h−1 and SQTs about one order of magnitude lower. In Aleppo pine, two volatile sources could be clearly distinguished: 1) de-novo synthesized emission of (E)-β-ocimene and linalool, which accounted for about 70% of the total VOC release, were not found in foliar VOC extracts and expressed light dependency (LD) and temperature responses typical for enzyme driven emissions; and 2) storage-derived emissions of various MTs and SQTs whose emissions increased exponentially with temperature, showed no light dependency and were all present in leaf extracts. In Rosemary, all emitted MTs and SQTs including many oxygenated compounds, showed responses typical for stored volatiles and were all found in leaf extracts. The emissions of individual volatiles or volatile classes could be well described with the commonly applied empirical algorithms developed for LD or non LD emissions. However, the shapes of the temperature responses, and hence the deduced coefficient values, were significantly different between oxygenated and non-oxygenated compounds. They also differed between the storage-derived emissions of the two plant species, for individual VOCs or VOC classes. We address the possible reasons for this variation in temperature responses and argue that they are mostly due to molecular interactions along the species specific leaf-internal diffusion paths including the build-up of transient VOC pools and degradation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017
 Publication Status: Published in print
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Title: Atmospheric Environment
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford [England] : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 152 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 212 - 221 Identifier: ISSN: 1352-2310
CoNE: http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/958480288336