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  Carotenoids, birdsong and oxidative status: administration of dietary lutein is associated with an increase in song rate and circulating antioxidants (albumin and cholesterol) and a decrease in oxidative damage

Casagrande, S., Pinxten, R., Zaid, E., & Eens, M. (2014). Carotenoids, birdsong and oxidative status: administration of dietary lutein is associated with an increase in song rate and circulating antioxidants (albumin and cholesterol) and a decrease in oxidative damage. PLoS One, 9(12): e115899. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0115899.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-2B42-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-A52D-9
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Casagrande, Stefania1, Author              
Pinxten, Rianne, Author
Zaid, Erika, Author
Eens, Marcel, Author
Affiliations:
1University of Antwerp, escidoc:persistent22              

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 Abstract: Despite the appealing hypothesis that carotenoid-based colouration signals oxidative status, evidence supporting the antioxidant function of these pigments is scarce. Recent studies have shown that lutein, the most common carotenoid used by birds, can enhance the expression of non-visual traits, such as birdsong. Nevertheless, the underlying physiological mechanisms remain unclear. In this study we hypothesized that male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) fed extra lutein increase their song rate as a consequence of an improved oxidative status. Although birdsong may be especially sensitive to the redox status, this has, to the best of our knowledge, never been tested. Together with the determination of circulating oxidative damage (ROMs, reactive oxygen metabolites), we quantified uric acid, albumin, total proteins, cholesterol, and testosterone, which are physiological parameters potentially sensitive to oxidation and/or related to both carotenoid functions and birdsong expression. We found that the birds fed extra lutein sang more frequently than control birds and showed an increase of albumin and cholesterol together with a decrease of oxidative damage. Moreover, we could show that song rate was associated with high levels of albumin and cholesterol and low levels of oxidative damage, independently from testosterone levels. Our study shows for the first time that song rate honestly signals the oxidative status of males and that dietary lutein is associated with the circulation of albumin and cholesterol in birds, providing a novel insight to the theoretical framework related to the honest signalling of carotenoid-based traits.

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 Dates: 2014
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0115899
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (12) Sequence Number: e115899 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850